Upcoming Event: The Faces of Gods and Goddesses with E. Massey at NJ’s Soul Journey

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Join E. Massey at the amazing Soul Journey and explore how the Gods and Goddesses of the world’s traditions are more than the faces and names we give them. Go beyond the myths and find the inter-contentedness of various pantheons through energies and not images. Learn how understanding their essence can break down the confines of how we view our own spirituality. Through a group meditation, attendees will tap into the primal energy of a choice Deity to guide the direction of the class. E. Massey Discusses how to build a stronger relationship with your Deities through energy and ritual. Acquire new practices by building upon your own teachings and views of the Gods and Goddesses. Discover how indigenous teachings and the Hermetic philosophies can reshape the modern spiritual concepts of Deities.
Time Duration: 2 hrs.
$30.00 p/p

Reserve your spot today by calling or stopping by Soul Journey in Butler NJ

Soul Journey

194 Main St, Butler, New Jersey 07405
(973) 838-6564

News: The Modern Witch’s Curriculum by E. Massey is Now Available as an E-book for Only 9.99

Currently Only Available at ww.e-massey.com

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There comes a time in every Witch’s life when they feel there is nothing left to learn. When all the classes and all the books just cannot satisfy our desire to want to learn more. What if there was a book for all magickal practitioners that went beyond Witchcraft and magick 101, and 102. What if there was a resource that allowed a Witch to grow and learn without the constraints of a specific tradition and at their own pace?

“A Modern Witch’s Curriculum” is that resource and will fulfill a Witch’s desire to learn and to grow. It allows those who are involved in any of the earth-based religions to progress and learn beyond their initial teachings. It provides many hands-on magickal and spiritual activities and experiences that can be started at any time of the year and on any day of the week. In a way this may be the last book you will ever purchase.

“This is the book that never ends”

“The Modern Witch’s Curriculum” combines history, science, and hands-on magickal and spiritual activities and experiences in an easy to follow calendar format. Although, the curriculum begins in October, it can be started at any time of the year and on any day of the week. There is no beginning or ending to this book. It can be used over and over again.

Best of all, the information in this book is relevant to anyone of any magickal tradition or spiritual background, whether they follow a Wiccan, Green or eclectic path, in fact, much of the book will find an audience to those who want to learn more about their own traditions and themselves. Many of the exercises and activities were created to guide the reader to areas of study and spiritual knowledge by using any resources that are accessible to them. These can be books, the Internet, and even individual experiences of the people within a circle or community. There are no boundaries or requirements on how the reader can collect the information for the activities; it’s all individual choice.

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Guided Meditation: New Paths with Hekate

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Over last few months I have found myself focused on so many projects (check them out at the end of the meditation), I hardly know the direction I am headed. Luckily, I have a lot of support to help me through this and despite everything I am doing, I still manage to keep my spiritual connections strong. I may not be doing as much magickal work as I feel I should be, but Hekate has always been the one to assure me that I am on the right path. She has understood that my everyday devotionals some times gets puts aside for something else. From the beginning, she has shown me that as long as I acknowledge her in my everyday tasks, I  am good with her. I found this to be very different from what I was used too. Basically, what she has told me was “I have put you on this path, and it is your turn to do the work to continue, the time will come when you can attend to me.”  Don’t get me wrong, It is not that I have not done anything spiritually or magickally over the last few months, I have just slowed down from where I was before. One way that I attempted to stay on a routine is by holding ritual with my group. Unfortunately, the last few times we have had to cancel thanks to the crazy weather here in Pennsylvania.

This guided meditation was from the last full moon ritual that I wrote for the group. I had wanted to share it early but I wanted to wait until I had done it with my group, well that never happened so here it is…

Items needed before you begin: A silver bowl filled with water, Pen and Paper, Candle dedicated to the Goddess Hekate and your favorite incense for meditation.

Before you begin light incense and the candle dedicated to the Goddess Hekate.

Think about the direction you would like your path to take you, whisper this into the bowl of water, take notice of how your breath ripples the water.

Close your eyes, make yourself comfortable and relax. Breath in deeply through your nose, filling your belly, hold for a count of three and exhale through your mouth. Repeat 3x.

Feel the room around you, acknowledge the glow of Hekate’s candles and scent of incense.
As you breath in, begin to visualize the smoke of the incense circling you, surrounding you. It begins to create a bubble around you. This bubble will protect your body on your journey.

The smoke begins fill the room, like a white mist rolling in, becoming more and more dense. Reflecting on the mist is cool white light.

Slowly the light grows brighter and with it the mist starts to disperse, fading away and leaving you standing on rocky terrain, in front of a cave mouth. It is night but everything is cast in a cool blue light. In search of its source you look up and see the moon in full glory. Returning back to your surroundings, to the right of the cave opening is a white statue of Hekate, she is bearing two torches and looking up at the moon. At the statues feet is a large silver bowl of liquid that holds a complete reflection of the full moon.

Wanting to take a closer look at the bowl, you approach the statue. Within, seconds a young girl wearing a white and gold tunic appears out of no where. She points to the bowl and tells you that this is where your journey will begin and where it will end. The bowl is your universe and you need to tell it what you want and that Hekate is only here to shed light on the path you are to take. She continues by telling you to whisper into the bowl, your one true goal or destination.

You thank the girl and she again pointing, this time toward the cave, and tells you that is where your path will start. You begin to walk past her into the cave, inside it is lit by torches hung on both sides of the cave, and you see that the cave narrows to a tunnel. As You walk deeper into the cave you notice that it begins to slope downwards. Soon the tunnel opens out into a cavern. Its ceiling is so high you cannot see it.  The walls and floors are spotted with crystals embedded in the rock, in the center of the cavern stands an altar bearing another silver bowl with a blue flame burning in it.  The light from the flame is reflected by all the crystals throughout the cavern, making it seem as though you are floating in space.

You approach the altar, but as you come close to it, the altar disappears and before you is the figure of Hekate standing in its place.  She wears a simple white tunic and a silver rayed crown. Despite the disappearance of the flame, the cavern is still filled with the light reflected by the crystals.

Hekate smiles at you and points to the far wall behind her.  Among the crystals you can see another silver bowl sitting in an alcove of the rock wall.  Without a word you know what you are being called to do. As you approach the bowl, Hekate’s voice follows you, and she says “This is vision bowl of the Oracles.  You may look into it and it will show you a path for you to follow.” At first glance in to the bowl you can see the full moon. This image fades and begins to show you, your path as it will be as of this night. Watch and remember.

After a while Hekate speaks again, and tells you it is time to go and hands you a piece of paper. She explains that you are to place it into the silver bowl at the mouth of the cave. You thank Hekate and walk towards the entrance you came in through and start to walk up the sloping tunnel towards the surface. Standing once more in the cave opening out in the moonlight with your paper in hand. Turning around you look again at the statue, and see that Hekate is no longer holding torches, but is holding the silver bowl with the blue flame from the altar that was inside the cave. You walk over and place the paper that Hekate gave you into the bowl. As the paper burns it turns into brilliant red light.

As you stare at the beauty of her statue, and consider how lifelike it is, you notice a white mist rolling in, becoming more and more dense, surrounding you and obscuring your surroundings, so you can no longer see the statue or the cave.  All around you is the mist.  And now the mist starts to disperse, and as it does so you see once more the walls around you, the ceiling above and the floor below.  You become aware of yourself in the room with Hekate.s candles once more.

Open your eyes when you ready.

After you have collected yourself, using the pen and paper write down the end goal you now have been shown by Hekate. Light on fire off the Hekate candle and drop it into the bowl of water. Extinguish candle when done.

 

Along with my newest book and class tour. Here is some of the projects I have been up too, click on the image for more information.

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Fantasy Woman Dark Girl Gothic Horror Person

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Info Coming Soon

 

 

Imbolc, A Festival of (Hekate, The) Light (Bringer), an adaptation from Casting Creative Magickal Circles.

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I have been so consumed with the store, organizing events, and finalizing my Salem tour that I haven’t had a chance to post something new on my blog. I am also hoping by the end of January everything will be put into place and I can return to finishing up “The Little Witch’s Curriculum” before the summer. This would put me around Imbolc. I can honestly say this is not one of my favorites of the Wheel but I do still celebrate it with my group. I also have my own specific practice for this time of the year. I use this “Festival of Lights” to burn off all of the last year’s candles to end or release their magick through one ritual. Although in my own personal practice, I don’t necessarily follow the “Wiccan” Wheel of the year as much as I used to, this year I want (need) to return back to having a more structured spiritual practice. This “resolution” for the year really wasn’t my idea, it was Hekate, who guided me to return to my beginnings. Despite an already cumbersome schedule, I do understand why and the need to do this. It isn’t so much for the religious ideals, but for the routine of ritual and practice. This homecoming would also include more Moon rituals and devotions, all of which would focus around Hekate in some way or another. Thankfully, I am not traveling this journey alone, I completely am letting her guide me every step of the way. Much of this new curve has rolled over into my group, which has been recently reinvented sort of speak as well.  However, we do still hold to The Wheel of the year and enjoy the celebrating of the Sun’s path around the earth. It just now has a foundation in Hekate’s mysteries.

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For this year’s group Imbolc, I plan to use this circle casting from my book “Casting Creative Magickal Circles”. I feel that this one can easily be altered to include the Phosphorus (light-bringer) or Dadophoros (torch-bearer) epithets of Hekate. The adaptations are shown in red.

Festival of Light Group Circle

Items needed: one blue(red) altar candle, one tea light candle for every participant.

Prior to your Imbolc ritual request that every participant brings one tea light to the ritual.

Before starting make sure that all participants have their candles in hand. When ready, begin in the east; the direction of the rising sun(light). Start by lighting the blue(red) altar candle saying:

“We come together in honor of the growing sun(Hekate’s growing light),

Round and round we are bound.”

Starting with the closest person light their candle off the blue(red) altar candle, direct each participant to light their candle off the person next to them. While chanting:

“Round and round we are bound!”

Continue clockwise until all candles are lit.

Once everyone’s candle is light, direct the participants to hold them up and say:

“Together we cast this circle of protection and love (light),

Round and round we are bound.

Gathered together to honor the sun (as Hekate Phosphorus, The Light Bearing Queen) .

With harm to none.”

Visualize protective and loving energy connecting each candle, then expanding into a sphere around your space.

Saying: “So mote it be”.

After the circle is cast direct everyone to place his or her candles on the altar for the duration of the ritual.

When you are ready to release the circle have everyone gather his or her candles. Depending on the length of your ritual some of the candles may have burnt out. Lit or unlit it will not matter for the releasing of the circle. When all participants have their candles in hand, direct them to turn facing outward away from the altar.

Say or something similar:

“We release our circle of love and light (Hekate’s light),

Out into the world.

May its light bring joy (enlightenment) to those in need.”

 

Direct everyone to extinguish his or her candles.

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Don’t forget to check out E. Massey’s new store The Hierophant

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Event: E. Massey at NJ’s Iron Garden

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Join me at one of the area’s most unique gatherings for an open discussion on Familiars and Magickal Pets.

Iron Garden DEC 28th 2018 Schedule

KEY NOTE SPEAKER: Lorraine Henrich of the
Modern Mystery School
on Creating Sacred Space
CONCLAVE: Familiars and Magical Pets
w/ E. Massey
ART EXHIBITOR:
The Photography of Michelle Simone
MERCHANTS:
. Expressive Designs & Crafts w/ HeathenWear
. Spiritual Goods w/ Botanica San Lazaro
. Art Oddities w/ Immortalis Memoriae
. Resident Merchant Olde Thyme Witch
. Tarot Readings w/ Kathy Gonzalez
CEREMONY:
Servitor Servitude w/ Cenobite Crymson Syron

The Iron Garden is a New Jersey based organization providing a safe haven for gathering, socialization, education, promotion of the arts, charity-work and fun for the New Jersey Nightkind Community. The Iron Garden is comprised of mature, discrete, intelligent, like-minded folk.
The Iron Garden welcomes Houses, Covens, Dens and Ronin Independents who are Pagan, Vampires, Witches, Therians, Otherkin, Black Swans, Life-stylers, Poets and Scholars alike. We ask that our members be over the age of 21, dress appropriately and maintain proper conduct.
The Iron Garden monthly gatherings are held at private rooms Downstairs at QXT’s Night Club at 428 Mulberry Street in Newark, NJ.
www.IronGarden.org for more information

Witch Cords: By Knot and Feather or Whatever

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Witch’s ladder found in England in 1878

Other than candle magick, Witch cords are my favorite type of sympathetic magick to use. Cord magick also known as knot magick, or a Witch’s ladder is a very old form of folk magick. Traditionally the ladder is made from knotted cord or hair, natural items and charms are knotted or braided with a specific magickal intention in mind. The number of knots and types of woven items can vary as well as the color and number of cords.

The first recorded evidence of a witch ladder was found in an old house in Somerset, England in 1878. A “rope” with feathers and other items woven into it was found in the attic space. However, this is not the only account of such cords used for magickal intentions. The Gospel of The Witches Author, Charles Godfrey Leland discovered that the Witches in Italy used a similar form of the Witch’s ladder, called a “Witches garland”; Which was made of a cord, and contained black hen feathers. It was said that a spell was uttered as each knot was tied and that the cord was placed under the victim’s bed, to cause the ill fortune. Another was mentioned in an article found In Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould’s “Curgenven”; published in 1893. In his account the ladder was made of wool, and white and brown thread, and at every two inches was tied cock’s feathers. It’s maker then would weave into it; ill intentions intended for the victim. The ladder was then thrown to the bottom of a pond.

This type of folk-magick can also be found in its simplest form, also known as “knot magick”. Knot magick was traditionally been used by sailors to bind winds and then untying the knot to stir up a wind. The “Old-wives tale” of using a square knot on a bandage would make a wound heal faster.

marksamcord.jpgDespite it being overlooked by modern Witches, cord magick is very effective and can be done anywhere, at any time, and with any items you have on hand. I often recommend it for those who live and work in non-accepting places. They can be simple or lavish in design, all depends on the Witch. One of the more attractive cords I carry on my online store, The Hierophant, was created by “The Staten Island Witch” Mark Eadicicco for Samhain. Whereas my cords tend to be more traditional in style. Whether of “knot” you choose to cast a more traditional one or a modern one, it’s all about the intention weaved within.

Typically, the more modern “traditional” knot spells use nine knots. While constructing the cord; concentrate and focus your energy on your intent and repeated for each knot that you tie. Thus, your magick will continue to work as long as the knots are tied. Once your goal has manifested or is no longer needed, depending on the intent you should untie, cut and/or dispose of the cord. Tied with in the knots can vary depending on your intent, as would the color of the cords.

To make a basic modern Witch’s ladder, you will need yarn, ribbon, or cord in a color that matches your intent. Some Witches like to use three different colors, one or two for intent (i. e.: money and success), one to represent the knotter (or two in cases of love), and a third to bind (usually red) and nine items that are similar in correspondence (beads, shells, bones, buttons, feathers, stones or whatever you have on hand).

Cut the yarn in a workable length. Tie the ends of the three pieces of yarn together into your first knot. Begin braiding the yarn together, tying and knotting the feathers or beads into the yarn, while adding your energy and envisioning your intent. If you wish, you can say this variation of the traditionally used chant as the items are tied into the knots (not sure where the traditional one evolved from, but this is the one I have used in the past):

By knot of one, this has spell’s begun.
By knot of two, the magick comes true.
By knot of three, so it shall be.
By knot of four, my power is stored.
By knot of five, my will shall it drive.
By knot of six, this spell I fix.
By knot of seven, the future I leaven.
By knot of eight, my will be fate.
By knot of nine, what is done is mine.

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Be sure to stop by E. Massey’s online store, The Hierophant.

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A Day of Thanks and Giving: Understanding the Truth About Thanksgiving and Celebrating it as a Pagan

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Since Samhain I have not had to time to even think about the upcoming holidays. With the opening of the online portion of my store, The Hierophant, setting up my 2019 Salem area tour (yes, I did say Salem, Woohoo!, and finishing up my 2018 classes I have been so consumed. So, I thought I take a moment to talk about what I have come to rename “A day of thanks and giving”. Let’s start with what is commonly taught about Thanksgiving, then what we know as the truth and why I have renamed it and a way we as Witches and Pagans can celebrate it with respect to others who you may be sharing a table with.

Thanksgiving as We Commonly Know It

Thanksgiving is a national American holiday, celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November. Originally celebrated as a harvest type festival. Since 1789, Thanksgiving has been celebrated nationally but did not become a federal holiday until 1863.

What Americans commonly call the “First Thanksgiving” was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World. It was a feast that had lasted for three days and was reported that it was attended by 90 Native Americans (Wampanoag) and 53 Pilgrims. Another reason for this feast was that it was a symbolic gesture of peace and thanks between the settlers and “Indians”, after an English-speaking chief named Squanto, taught the settlers how to survive. At this feast it was said to contain food that had been grown by the Pilgrims by means of “Indian” knowledge. Turkey, goose, duck, corn, squashes were all to have been placed on this recounted table of “gratitude”.

The Thanksgiving Story as We Should Know It

The real story began in 1614 when European explorers returned to Europe with a ship full of Patuxet Indians bound for slavery. In their efforts to capture new slaves from untouched lands, they had left behind smallpox which virtually wiped out those who had escaped capture. When the Pilgrims arrived in the “new world” they found only one living Patuxet Indian, a man named Squanto (who’s real name was Tisquantum) who had survived slavery and knew their language. He taught them to grow corn and to fish, and negotiated a peace treaty between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Nation which was short-lived.

Word had spread in England about the Eden to be found in the “new world” which caused others to arrive by the boat load. They seized land by any means possible, capturing strong young Natives for slaves and killing the rest. However, the Pequot Nation had not agreed to Squanto’s peace treaty and fought back. Making the lesser known Pequot War one of the bloodiest Indian wars ever fought.

pequot_warThen In 1637 the body of a white man was discovered dead in a boat. Blaming the Pequot tribe who had gathered possibly for their annual Green Corn ceremonies. In the early morning, while the tribe slept, armed settlers invaded and surrounded their camp . Upon ordering them to come outside, those who did were shot or beaten to death and those who remained inside were burned alive. The victory was celebrated with feast as a thank you to their God for winning over the savages and for the newly acquired land.

While many Indigenous people and historians, still debate over what exactly happened to what directly led to the creation of “Thanksgiving Day.”, the truth is it wasn’t all rainbows and unicorns, hell it wasn’t even turkey and buttered corn.

National Day of Mourning

The National Day of Mourning is an annual protest organized since 1970 by Indigenous Americans of New England (although, others have joined in) on the fourth Thursday of November, the same day as Thanksgiving. Participants in the National Day of Mourning honor their ancestors and the struggles to survive today. It is also to educate Americans about the history of Thanksgiving. In an interview, Cedric Cromwell, the chairman and president of the tribal council of the Mashpee Wampanoag, said, “…it was a holocaust, and that holocaust must be shared and communicated so that we ensure that mankind doesn’t do that to each other again”. I found it interesting that he still sits down with his family on the day, but for him it’s meaning is about history and truth rather than the myths we have been feed.

A Day of Thanks and Giving

Although, I grew up under Native influence, we still celebrated Thanksgiving (for my grandfather it was always Turkey Day). For us it wasn’t so much about the “American history” it was more of a way for all of our family to get together, and for football. Not that anyone in family really was a die-hard football fan. It was just the American thing to do, I guess. It wasn’t until I reached high school that I learned the horrible history of Thanksgiving. For me this began the drop of calling it Thanksgiving Day, moving on to what my Grandfather called it “Turkey Day”. I’m still not sure to this day if he used this title because of its history or if that’s how he referred to it.  It wasn’t until years later that I used A Day of Thanks and Giving to denote Thanksgiving Day. For me, it means a day to give thanks to the earth and its bounty and to the people in my life by giving the means of food and good cheer. It also has a denotation of respect and honor to many of my ancestors.

father_knows_best_thanksgiving_1954Now that I am hours away from my parents, we do not spend this holiday together. However, I do spend it with my cousin, who was is the daughter of my first teacher. Although, she was raised within a Wiccan household, she is primary Christian based. Which means we say a prayer before we eat. There have been times when this has fallen on me to deliver. With respect to all those present I tend to keep the focus on the Harvest and family aspects of the Holiday. After the prayer we always share a round of things we are thankful for. The following is the prayer that I have used, and of course you can always tweak it to your family and situations.

Day of Thanks and Giving Prayer

We are thankful to Mother Earth for the bounty before us,

We are thankful to our Father who shines above us,

We ask for blessings be bestowed upon our friends and family seated here today

And to those that are not with us but are in spirit

We share this meal in love and respect.

So, it is, so shall be

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Don’t Forget to check out E. Massey’s Online Store The Hierophant

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