How to Write Your Own Guided Meditation from The Modern Witch’s Curriculum by E. Massey

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In “The Modern Witch’s Curriculum”, the month of March has a focus on meditation and healing. One of the activities the reader is asked to do, is to write their own guided meditations. Out of all the writing I do, guided meditations are my absolute favorite. As an artist, this is the perfect way for me to convey the images and worlds I create in my mind and put them in an expressive format. Writing guided meditations is not as hard as you might think, in fact, if you have been self-meditating you have already been creating your own meditations. All you need to do is put them down on paper.

Writing Your Own Guided Meditation

Before you begin have a clear intent or goal for your guided meditation. Get into the right frame of mind, I like to take a few moments to focus and relax as if I am actually going to meditate. This makes it much easier for you to visualize what you are writing about. You may want to plan out your script, starting with a bullet point list of events you wish to describe in the meditation. Another method is to get into a state of deep relaxation, and then allow the entire meditation script to flow. Personally, I allow my guided meditation scripts to gradually form in my mind as I write. Allowing my mind to create what is happening, like watching a movie unfold and then putting it down on paper. Everyone is different, so the approach you take is entirely up to you. You may want to add music or environmental sounds to your meditation. Music can make or break a guided meditation it not only adds beauty but it also helps to relax and depth to the overall mood of the journey. As you write your meditation, you may want to add in symbolic images. In a deeper state, symbolic guided imagery can be very powerful. Consider the specific purpose of your guided meditation, and then introduce symbols that represent that purpose and give deeper meaning to the journey. Be wary of sentence length. Allowing a moment for visualizations to occur. Then move on to the next sentence.

General Structure of a Guided Meditation

  1. Getting comfortable

Give the listener a little time to prepare for the meditation and to get comfortable.

  1. Start with a general relaxation

Spend five to ten minutes relaxing the body and the mind with visualizations and/or breathing exercises. You may want to use a countdown technique during or just after relaxation.

  1. Begin the Journey

Start by describing the environment that you will experience. Include all five senses by describing what can be seen, smelled or heard and touched. The more one can connect their senses to the environment, the more deeply they will become immersed. Be careful not to let the description drag on. Don’t spend too much time describing specifics; your imagination will automatically fill in any blanks.

  1. The Return

During the meditation you will become very relaxed and will have entered into a deep state of relaxation. Coming back to normal waking consciousness should be done gently and gradually. One common way is to guide listeners back to the starting point of the meditation. Once you have returned to the starting point, slowly bring your awareness back into the world around them. Becoming aware of their physical body and of their surroundings.

The “Modern Witch’s Curriculum” is available in both print and e-book formats on this website or through your favorite online bookstore.

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Don’t forget to check out E. Massey’s online store

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You Want a Time Out! Meditation and Children

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 A few years ago, I was lucky enough to be part of a social-emotional program designed for early education. Its main focus was to help children to be mindful of their own and others emotions through teacher guided activities and meditation. The children were encouraged to practice meditations of body awareness, patience, and relaxation. As teachers, we ourselves were taught not only how to meditate (I was one up on the others there) but also how to encourage children to want to meditate. By using modeling instead of actual lessons, the children were not forced into learning meditation techniques all at once. This method of “teaching” through example provides a stress free and positive outcome for the child and laid the groundwork for later incorporating actual meditation techniques into the classroom.

There are many benefits from meditation for children, not only in the magickal world, but in everyday living as well. Meditation helps reduce stress, anxiety, and aggression. It improves concentration, memory, and creativity. Children who meditate show a better sense of awareness, relaxation, and an overall healthier mind and body. It’s also been thought to strengthen the immune system and can lower the risk of future health problems. As an early childhood educator, I have seen these benefits manifest first hand.

When given the opportunity to observe the meditative practices of an adult, children will most likely want to sit alongside you and imitate what you are doing. By giving your little Witch this opportunity to sit with you during your own meditation practices, they will begin to learn themselves. If you do not have a regular meditation practice, this is a great way to grow and experience mindfulness together.

Below is a technique that I have used in the classroom and in my Little Witches workshops.

A Basic Relaxation Technique for Children

I recommend beginning on your own in a quiet setting, choose a time before a meal or before bed, soon after your child will follow. For older children you can explain to them why you are sitting in silence.

Begin by asking your child if they would like to play a relaxing game with you. Continue only if they show interest. If they show no interest one day they may the following day. I recommend doing the technique yourself, the child will become interested after some time.

Sitting in a chair, ask your child to sit with his or her feet flat on the floor and hands on his/her knees. Using a gentle, slow voice, saying or something similar:

“Look for a spot on the wall that you would like to look at.”

This can be any spot the child chooses. Explain to your child to keep their feet flat on the floor and their hands on your knees.

“Breathe in nice and slow and let it out nice and slow. When you feel your body wants to get wiggly, just say in your head, it’s okay that you’re feeling wiggly.”

“Try to keep your eyes on the spot as long as you can.”

Do this for only a minute or two the first time, and expand by one to two minutes each session. A good practice to maintain is to not exceed your child’s age in the number of minutes you spend in a session.

FYI: Having a good meditation practice can help encourage children with self-awareness, to be themselves, and have a greater belief in their own potential.